Here’s How Garth Brooks Was A Financial Genius With His Tour Schedule

Garth Brooks announcing his latest tour unleashed fans pent-up energy of their wallets and he capitalized on that with an efficient tour schedule. Continue reading →

Time to tax the famous entertainers

I have no issue with anyone being active in politics, but famous people get a bigger stage than the “Average Joe”. Continue reading →

Michael Jackson paid child molestation victims hundreds of millions

In a gruesome law enforcement briefing on what was found at the Michael Jackson compound by law enforcement,
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Percent of People Who Listen To The Radio

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The folks over at Priceonomics.com did a lengthy research article on what Americans listen to on the radio these days.

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Portable Speakers: 1980’s vs Today

How people listened to music in the 1980’s with their portable radios
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Present day device for a portable speaker which you can listen to music from a device like your cellphone. You can buy it at Amazon.com for $36
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This is the TDK A12 TREK Micro NFC Bluetooth Portable Mini Wireless Outdoor Speaker. It weighs 6.6 ounces and product dimension of 3.2 x 3.2 x 1.2 inches. Power source is one AAA battery.

Michael Jackson Still Owes Taxes

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The King of Pop may be gone but his estate is still being hounded by the IRS. According to Forbes, they are going for more blood:

In a previously unreported court filing, the government says that IRS auditors originally thought the King of Pop owned only 50% of certain master recordings at his death in June 2009, when he really owned 100% of them. That 100% interest was worth $91 million by the IRS’ figuring, compared to the $11 million reported on the Jackson estate tax return.

The change brings the IRS’ valuation of Jackson’s estate and lifetime taxable gifts up to $1.178 billion, compared to the $7 million the estate reported. The IRS now wants a total of $525.6 million in tax and $205.1 million in gross valuation misstatement and negligence penalties. (Any interest owed will be on top of that.) Of course both the IRS and the estate’s values are best regarded as opening bids in what could be a long negotiation. A trial, if there is one, is far off.