Example Of How Chicago’s Crime Strategy Endangers The Public

Chicago law enforcement faces a daunting task in maintaining safety in the city while ideological politicians and judges mandate horrible policies.

Police work in the public’s eye seems to end when the handcuffs goes on a suspect and they are taken to jail. It doesn’t. Police morale and efforts in being heavy hitters out on the streets in getting criminals into the system largely depends on how they see the courts treatment of criminals. Perfect example is Chicago as a case study. The law enforcement community and court systems are worlds apart.

Here’s some more information about what I described above in regards to criminals getting out of jail on low bail via Law Enforcement Today:

Cook County Jail is a revolving door for thugs and gang bangers arrested while in possession of a firearm. Carrying a loaded firearm in Chicago is considered a non-violent crime and as such individuals arrested are allowed very low cash bonds, an I bond; sign your name and out the door you go, or the famous Electric Monitoring.

This preferential treatment was initiated by passage of the Bail Reform Act that took place in June, 2017. Chief Judge Evans went further and replaced the six sitting judges from bond courts with others that were handpicked to favor lower bonds, and often no bonds. These judges have allowed 50 percent of gun toting thugs back on Chicago’s streets on electric monitoring or by posting no bond at all.

We had 3,561 people shot last year in Chicago. And the elected officials previously mentioned deemed carrying a gun in Chicago as a non-violent crime. As a result, half of those arrested were returned to our streets to presumably finish whatever business they were doing when arrested with a loaded gun.

Chicago Police have made arrests in less than five percent of the 3,561 shootings from 2016 and our elected officials allow future shooters back on the street before the ink is dry on the latest shooting police report.

 

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