Debt Bomb: Minnesota’s Pension Debt Explodes Using Real Accounting

The Governmental Accounting Standards Board forces the state of Minnesota to use real accounting standards for its pension calculations and it’s not pretty.Remember, these changes are necessary after decades of politicians using fuzzy math and has real implications for taxpayers on bills that need paid and future interest rates on borrowing.

Here’s more from Bloomberg:

Minnesota’s debt to its workers’ retirement system has soared by $33.4 billion, or $6,000 for every resident, courtesy of accounting rules.

 The jump caused the finances of Minnesota’s pensions to erode more than any other state’s last year as accounting standards seek to prevent governments from using overly optimistic assumptions to minimize what they owe public employees decades from now. Because of changes in actuarial math, Minnesota in 2016 reported having just 53 percent of what it needed to cover promised benefits, down from 80 percent a year earlier, transforming it from one of the best funded state systems to the seventh worst, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.
The Minnesota’s teachers’ pension fund, which had $19.4 billion in assets as of June 30, 2016, is expected to go broke in 2052. As a result of the latest rules the pension has started using a rate of 4.7 percent to discount its liabilities, down from the 8 percent used previously. Its liabilities increased by $16.7 billion.
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